Category Archives: Community

Aston Veterinary Hospital : Pet Blog: Check the Chip Day

Is your dog or cat microchipped? In a study of more than 7,700 stray animals at animal shelters, only 22% of dogs and less than 2% of cats that were not microchipped were reunited with their owners. The return-to-owner rate for microchipped dogs was over 52% and for cats it was about 38.5%. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) have joined together to create a day for reminding pet owners to have their pets microchipped and to keep the registration information up-to-date. “National Check the Chip Day” is this Friday, August 15th.

A microchip is a small, electronic chip enclosed in a glass cylinder that is about the size of a grain of rice. Instead of running on batteries, the microchip is designed to be activated by a scanner that is passed over the area and then it transmits radiowaves that send the identification number to the scanner screen. Microchips are also designed to work for 25 years.

Implanting the microchip is as simple as a quick injection between the shoulder blades and can be done in a routine appointment. No surgery or anesthesia is required and it is no more painful than a typical injection.

You can take advantage of the day by making an appointment with us to have your pet microchipped. Then be sure to immediately register the chip. There are many databases that allow you to register your pet’s microchip but the one that animal shelters and veterinarians search first is AAHA’s Universal Pet Microchip Lookup Tool. Or, if your pet is already microchipped, you can check the chip’s registration information by going to the manufacturer’s database and making sure everything is up-to-date. Most of the time if an animal is microchipped and not returned to their owner, it’s because the information is incorrect or there isn’t any information provided.

A microchip does not replace identification tags or rabies tags. Identification tags are the easiest and quickest way to process an animal and contact the owner. If the pet is not wearing a collar or tags, or if either the collar or ID tag is lost, a microchip may be the only way to find a pet’s owner. Rabies tags allow to others to quickly see that your pet is vaccinated against the disease. It is more difficult to trace a lost pet’s owners with rabies tags as it can only be done when veterinary clinics or county offices are open. Microchip databases are online or can be reached through the phone 24/7/365.

You can use this useful flyer from the AVMA to keep a record of your pet’s microchip number and manufacturer.

 

Aston Veterinary Hospital has been caring for pets in Aston and Media — and greater Delaware County — for more than 60 years. We are a full-service, AAHA-certified, small animal facility providing professional health care for your pet. In 1983 Deborah Brzezinski bought the hospital and with the help and support of her family and dedicated staff, grew the hospital from a solo practice to over five veterinarians and a staff of more than 25 employees. Our mission is “to be there for our clients,” and that means being available to you when you need us. We are closed only four days a year: New Years, Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. We are also one of few local hospitals that are open on Sundays. Stop in and see us!

Aston Veterinary Hospital : Pet Blog: Military Personnel Discount

Veterinary Discount for Military Personnel

We are now offering a 10% discount to all United States military members to thank you for your service to our country.

This includes active, inactive and retired members who provide a valid military ID. Qualifying military members and their spouses (spouses must bring a copy of their spouses military ID) will receive a 10% discount on services rendered (this excludes products). This discount will begin on Memorial Day but will be ongoing with no end date.

AVMA Tools for K-12 Educators

AVMA Tools for K-12 Educators

The AVMA recognizes the important role of teachers, counselors, parents, and advisors in guiding the future careers of today’s students. With a growing need for trained veterinarians to protect animal and human health, AVMA has created materials to help you cultivate your students’ interest in science and technology.

The AVMA educational products and activities are targeted to various grade levels and most can be easily downloaded for use in the classroom. For materials available upon request, Contact the AVMA, call 847-285-6655 or go to: https://www.avma.org/KB/K12/Pages/AVMA-educational-resources.aspx

Know the Law: The Animal Welfare Act

The Animal Welfare Act was signed into law in 1966. It is the only Federal law in the United States that regulates the treatment of animals in research, exhibition, transport, and by dealers. Other laws, policies, and guidelines may include additional species coverage or specifications for animal care and use, but all refer to the Animal Welfare Act as the minimum acceptable standard. The Act is enforced by the USDA, APHIS, Animal Care agency.

To learn more, go to: https://awic.nal.usda.gov/government-and-professional-resources/federal-laws/animal-welfare-act

Schedule Pet Play Dates

Dog-friendly canines benefit from play dates. Consider arranging play dates with your dog’s favorite friends, which can be done right in your backyard or at pet-friendly parks. Even when the weather outside isn’t the most inviting, dog parks can give your dog both off-leash exercise and interaction with other canines. Doggy daycares are another way to give your dog interaction while you’re away from home or when you just need a break.

Volunteer at the Delaware Humane Association

Volunteering at DHA. DHA is always interested in dedicated, caring volunteers to help us carry out their mission. A small group of volunteers founded DHA in 1957, and a very large group of volunteers keeps them moving forward more than 50 years later. Without the hundreds of dedicated volunteers who partner with them to serve the animals, they could not fulfill our mission.

To learn about the numerous volunteer opportunities, go to: https://www.dehumane.org/site/PageServer?pagename=volunteer_main

SNOW SAFETY TIP FOR DOGS

Avoid letting your dog off the leash on snow or ice, especially during a snowstorm, dogs can lose their scent and easily become lost. More dogs are lost during the winter than during any other season, so make sure yours always wears ID tags.

Pets, Candy and Xylitol

FDA Warns Pet Owners on the Dangers of Xylitol Ingestion in Dogs and Ferrets

The Food and Drug Administration is cautioning consumers about the risks associated with the accidental consumption of xylitol by dogs and ferrets. Xylitol is a sugar alcohol approved for use in many common products, including sugar-free baked goods, candy, oral hygiene products, and chewing gum.

Xylitol can be found in many over-the-counter drugs such as chewable vitamins and throat lozenges and sprays. It can also be purchased in bulk bags for use in home baking. These products are intended only for human use.

FDA is aware of complaints involving dogs that experienced illness associated with the accidental consumption of xylitol. Xylitol is safe for humans but it can be harmful to dogs and ferrets.

FDA is advising consumers to always read the label on products and to not presume that a product that is safe for humans is safe for your pet.

The FDA reports included clinical signs such as a sudden drop in blood sugar (hypoglycemia), seizures and liver failure. If you suspect your pet has ingested xylitol, some signs to look for are depression, loss of coordination and vomiting. The signs of illness may occur within minutes to days of ingesting xylitol. Owners should consult their veterinarian or pet poison control center immediately for advice if they know or suspect that their pet has ingested a human product containing xylitol.